Malton Rail

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Malton rail.jpg

Malton Rail Service
Regions: Northeast - Northwest - Southeast - Southwest
Lines: Blue - Brown - Fuchsia - Green - Orange - Purple - Red - Yellow


History

MaltonRail-Poster1.jpg

Malton Rail, (known as Malton Railway until 1976) was first established in 1903 by the Malton City Council through a deal arranged with the National Railway Association (NRA) and United National Investment Company of Eastern Financers (UNICEF). With the power of the NRA and the financial backing of UNICEF, two forces best not opposed, the city's main railway tracks, the NorthSouth Line (now primarily the Green Line) and the EastWest Line (now primarily the Red Line), were constructed by November 1906. Of course, construction did not end with these two major lines, but continued to expand as more and more railway stations were constructed in nearly every one of the city's suburbs.

By 1918 the railway had completed construction of the Great Western Line which ran through all of the suburbs between Starlingtown and Owsleybank, providing swifter transport between east and west Malton as the earlier EastWest Line was used primarily to connect with the NorthSouth Line and thus provide inter-city transportation. It was not long before the NRA's trains were soon on track and providing both public and private transportation throughout Malton.

By 1930 the number of Malton's railway stations had nearly doubled, tripling by 1958, and quadrupling by 1976. By the 1980s, the rail network had taken its current form, with eight main lines serving the city. Malton became known as one of the most public transport-conscious cities in the entire country, with some suburbs having as many as 5 to 6 stations all within a 10 block area. Prior to the "Malton Incident" the only suburbs that did not possess even a single railway station were Shearbank, West Boundwood, and Stanbury Village, each for their own reasons.

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To this day survivors still dream of the day that the trains will run once again, perhaps allowing free and safe travel through zombie-infested Malton.

Lines & Stations

Malton's railway network is organized into eight lines. Three of these run primarily east-west: the Red, Fuchsia and Orange; two run northwest-southeast: Blue and Brown; and two run southwest-northeast: Green and Purple. The last line, the Yellow, is circular and runs around the periphery of Malton.

A map of the rail lines as of 2005 is at left.

There are 250 train stations in Malton. Of these, quite a few operate as single stations, despite having multiple names; often, these are interchanges with each "station" serving one line, or include an old station and its replacement.

32 of these stations are interchanges serving multiple lines, and two of these serve three lines: Alkin-Priestley in Ridleybank (considered the "central station" of Malton) and Fennessy in Judgewood.

For the current statuses of stations, see the Railway Status Map and the individual line pages below.

Malton Rail Blue Line
Hardwick | Imber | Batton | Snook | Date | Hewlett | Mules | Garwood | Fennessy NF | Mahagan | Pedel | Wooman-Underwood Y | Ayliffe | Norvell | Hayes | Shipp | Budgett | Kitting | Bathe | Newstead | Alkin-Priestley RG | Blocksidge | Buckmaster | Chalderwood P | Gajewski | Exon | Hutchin O | Shean | Hame Y | Leave | Mountstephen | Chicke-Hedbitch N | Phabayn | Whalen | Cowdrey | Ketley | Creyghton
Malton Rail Brown Line
Dawney | Pople | Holloms | Ormrod | Cridge | Fennessy FB | Fowler | Butt | Nettleton Y | Lea | Cardwell-Blunt R | Brownsell | Sheil-Pask | Rio | Gorham G | Calvert | Candy | Prentice | Whittle-Clark P | Norris O | Grice | Coomb | Beck Y | Methringham | Flower | Milverton | Chancellor | Garton | Tikanoff | Mesney | Chicke-Hedbitch B | Derryman | Shickell | Shillito O
Malton Rail Fuchsia Line
Bodilly | Grist | Peitevin | Barter | Fennessy NB | Sawtell | McEvoy | Newis-Reginaldus Y | Dorrington | Elkins | Peaty | Meads | Adolphy G | Essell | Gable | Seamour | Shackle | Cull | Gwilliam | Polgrahan P | Hopping | Sage | Crosbie-Hemborrow Y | Ashbee | Mesney
Malton Rail Green Line
Ashfield-Pritchard | Tope | Statham | Cradock | Brain | Cockburn | Loader | Duport | Guppey-Brooks Y | Hind | Voules P | Milton | Locket-Piegsa O | Gorham N | Mattravers | Hubbard | Cribb | Alkin-Priestley RB | Scarpendale | Woolsett | Thurlow | Springford | Adolphy F | Hardinge | Sambone | Royal Y | Stammers | Bruce
Malton Rail Orange Line
Ellicott | Matcham | Boyer | Haygarth | Mesney | Wakeham | Dye Y | Coleridge | Feltham | Toley | Corbin | Gilling | Turner | Locket-Piegsa G | Crespin | Ainslie | Stroud-Dadson P | Samways | Gass | Pattemore | Norris N | Shearston | Hutchin B | Cording Y | Fifoot | Shillito N | Keeling | Sellwood-Barens R
Malton Rail Purple Line
Meloney | Thomson | Foulkes | Spraggon Y | Voules G | Downing | Morliere | Bowerman | Pollet | Stroud-Dadson O | Cullingford | Whittle-Clark N | Basher | Chalderwood B | Pegg | Lawley R | Sebright | Glenmore | Polgrahan F | Windham | Rawlinson-Mechel Y | Swabey | Corp | Hellear | Kemble | Kitchingman | Youl | Spitter | Muirhead | Heddington | Gibb | Salter | Clipper | Kelloway-Roles Y
Malton Rail Red Line
Dewfall | Brimson | Capper | Ayre | Rumbell Y | Silwood | Sidey | Vearncombe | Bennet | Bayley | Cardwell-Blunt N | Mulock | Thynne | Fey | Alkin-Priestley GB | Hugo-Gingell | Beele-Copless | Lawley P | Perks | Whitlock | Colwill Y | Sellwood-Barens O
Malton Rail Yellow Line (clockwise)
Halse | Codman | Meade | Broad | Latter | Stranks | Gapper | Royal G | Phillipps | Broadbent | Kelloway-Roles P | Gillman | Dimon | Edge | Mornington | Rawlinson-Mechel P | Tolly | Darnell | Snaydon | Crosbie-Hemborrow F | Norton | Hembury | Colwill R | Beall | Cording O | Howarth | Hame B | Furzer | Turnock | Tobit | Beck N | Lamport | Northup-Cabble | Jenkins | Coutts | Charasse | McIlhargey | Plumb | Rennell | Hoyle | Clevely | Guppey-Brooks G | Corp | Spraggon P | Massey | Buck | Penning | Hope | Dye O | Hollard | Ruddle | Rumbell R | Carritt | Heathman | Nettleton N | Wooman-Underwood B | Bu | Newis-Reginaldus F | Halse
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